Monthly Archives: June 2014

Mulberry Watercolor Sketch

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I’ve discovered three mulberry trees in my new backyard. Two on one side dividing the property line and one dividing the other. I didn’t realize it was a mulberry until the berries developed.

Having a hunch this was mulberry, before I ate, I armed myself with a field guide to edible plants. Confirming, I partook in the most delicious free berries provided by my loving Father.

Please always double and triple check that the berries in the wild are safe before eating. Check leaf pattern too and do not rely solely on the look of the berry.

Anyway as I was eating my step daughter came out and was appalled. Flailing her arms and running towards me she screeched, “What the heck are you doing?!?”

I responded, “I’m eating mulberries. Look they’re safe.”
Then I showed her proof in the field guide.

In disgust she said, “I would NEVER! EWW. GROSS!”

Showing her PROOF AGAIN, I could not change her mind.

Then my neighbor came out and overheard our conversation and responded, “Oh we eat them all the time.”

Step-daughter pipes up, “Oh really? Cool!”
And begins to scarf them down.

I laughed because I have proof, but she believed practically a STRANGER.

Ha ha ha! Oh well, I’m thankful my neighbor came out and we were able to introduce this gem to the next generation!

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Finally Finches at Feeder Watercolor Sketch

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Finally.
After hanging the feeder at my new residence and watching not one single guest partake for 4 WEEKS….finally….a pair of American Goldfinches happily dine and I in the window, happily watch with a big silly grin from ear to ear.

So I start to wonder. How does a bird find a new feeder? By sight? By smell? And why does it take so long?

According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology:
“They are drawn to feeders because they see the seed, see or hear other birds feeding, have learned a “search pattern” for bird feeders, or are very inquisitive and investigate new things on their territory or along their migratory route. Seed eating birds do notice other birds at feeders–by sight and sound–and join them.”

Welcome friends. I’ve waited patiently. No not really, ha ha ha!

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Now go tell your friends where to get a good meal.
😀